Monthly Archives: October 2008

Arch Linux and the HP Compaq 2710p

I recently received a HP Compaq 2710p and I’m quite surprised by the performance of this convienent tablet.

After using it for a few weeks, I can say that it works well with GNU/Linux (Arch Linux in particular).  There are a few issues, however:

  • Use of the stylus occasionally conflicts with the default mouse.
  • Brightness of the screen is fixed (unchangeable) upon resume from suspend (both from disk and RAM).

Here is some information about the devices within the computer.

[antony@ARCH ~]$ lspci
00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Mobile PM965/GM965/GL960 Memory Controller Hub (rev 0c)
00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation Mobile GM965/GL960 Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 0c)
00:02.1 Display controller: Intel Corporation Mobile GM965/GL960 Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 0c)
00:19.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82566MM Gigabit Network Connection (rev 03)
00:1a.0 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #4 (rev 03)
00:1a.1 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #5 (rev 03)
00:1a.7 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller #2 (rev 03)
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) HD Audio Controller (rev 03)
00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 1 (rev 03)
00:1c.1 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 2 (rev 03)
00:1c.2 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 3 (rev 03)
00:1d.0 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #1 (rev 03)
00:1d.1 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #2 (rev 03)
00:1d.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #3 (rev 03)
00:1d.7 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller #1 (rev 03)
00:1e.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 Mobile PCI Bridge (rev f3)
00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82801HBM (ICH8M-E) LPC Interface Controller (rev 03)
00:1f.1 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 82801HBM/HEM (ICH8M/ICH8M-E) IDE Controller (rev 03)
02:09.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Ricoh Co Ltd R5C832 IEEE 1394 Controller (rev 05)
02:09.1 SD Host controller: Ricoh Co Ltd R5C822 SD/SDIO/MMC/MS/MSPro Host Adapter (rev 22)
02:09.2 System peripheral: Ricoh Co Ltd R5C843 MMC Host Controller (rev 12)
10:00.0 Network controller: Intel Corporation PRO/Wireless 4965 AG or AGN Network Connection (rev 61)

[antony@ARCH ~]$ lsusb
Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001
Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001
Bus 004 Device 003: ID 0461:4d17 Primax Electronics, Ltd
Bus 004 Device 002: ID 08ff:2580 AuthenTec, Inc.
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001
Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001
Bus 003 Device 004: ID 049f:0081 Compaq Computer Corp.
Bus 003 Device 003: ID 04b4:6560 Cypress Semiconductor Corp. CY7C65640 USB-2.0 "TetraHub"
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 03f0:171d Hewlett-Packard
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 
[antony@ARCH ~]$ uname -a
Linux ARCH 2.6.27-rc9 #2 SMP PREEMPT Thu Oct 9 00:58:03 EDT 2008 i686 Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU U7600 @ 1.20GHz GenuineIntel GNU/Linux
[antony@ARCH ~]$ df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5              15G  2.3G   12G  17% /
none                 1009M     0 1009M   0% /dev/shm
/dev/sda2              92M   15M   73M  17% /boot
/dev/sda6              15G  1.3G   13G  10% /home

I’ve kept the system relatively lightweight. Some applications that work well with this computer are:

  • mutt: imap gmail access
  • audacious: music
  • pidgin: instant messenger
  • wget: download manager
  • uxterm: terminal
  • firefox: browser
  • dosbox: games
  • dwm: window manager
  • bash: shell
  • netcfg: network manager

This computer is really convienent to carry around because it is so lightweight.  Soon, I will upgrade to Xorg 7.4 and see if the wacom driver has improved.

Setting up IMAP on Mutt

After receiving my HP 2710p, I decided to use IMAP instead of POP for
managing my email.  As you know, Mutt is my primary MUA (mail user agent).

The benefits of this setup are obvious: synchronous email (both on the computer
and on the webserver), space savings, and less programs to configure.

In this example, I’ll be setting up an IMAP connection to Gmail from Mutt.

First download the certificate of the organisation that is providing the IMAP
service.  Gmail uses “ThawtePremiumServerCA.crt”.  Make sure you compare your
checksum with the one provided by the Thawte Certificate Authority.  Place this
certificate in “~/.certs”.

Next, configure a profile for use with the IMAP connection.  I have an
engineering account with my university as well as a Gmail account, so I need two
profiles.  The Mutt profile is simple.

---~/.mutt/mutt1---
# email@gmail.com

source ~/.muttrc
set imap_user="email@gmail.com"
set folder="imaps://imap.gmail.com:993"
set spoolfile = "+INBOX"
set postponed=+"[Gmail]/Drafts"
set smtp_url="smtp://email@smtp.gmail.com:587/"
------

Note: My ~/.muttrc” contains global configuration values.

Next, simply add aliases for each profile that you create.  For example:

---~/.bashrc---
[ ... ]
alias mutt1="mutt -F ~/.mutt/muttrc_gmail"
alias mutt2="mutt -F ~/.mutt/muttrc_college"
------

To use your configuration, issue “mutt1” or “mutt2” at the prompt.

Managing your wireless connection with Wireless Tools for Linux

A lot of distributions offer their own wireless management tools.  While this can be helpful for a new user, an experienced GNU/Linux user knows that all these tools rely on the generic wireless extension offered by Wireless Tools for Linux.
Today I will show you how to manage your wireless connection by using a subset of the Wireless Tools (iwconfig, iwlist, and ifrename).

Note: I do not use wpa_supplicant.

Some required settings.

You need CONFIG_NET_RADIO=y in your kernel config (it creates /proc/net/wireless).  Also, your results from this tutorial will improve with Wireless Tools version 27 and above.  Use iwconfig –version to determine your version.

Make your interface consistent with ifrename.

ifrename allows you to assign a consistent name to each of your network interfaces.  Normally, interface names are dynamic, meaning that each interface is assigned a name on a first detected, first assigned basis.  Because each interface has some static elements, you can apply naming rules on them to provide a consistent name regardless of when the interface was detected.

Of course, you need to ascertain some information from each device before applying rules to them.  The file to edit is /etc/iftab.

Entries in /etc/iftab consist of a set of mappings: interface name and descriptors.  I find it easier to match devices based on their drivers.  Example entries can be found in `man iftab`.  I use:

b44 driver b44
iwl driver iwl3945

After you have finished editing /etc/iftab, add ifrename to your boot up scripts to automatically rename your devices.  You’ll need to make sure that the command is issued before the devices are brought up.  Use `ifrename -V -D` to see what would happen if you actually issued the command.

Managing the network.

iwconfig iwlist are your tools.

The first thing you usually do is search for available networks.  `iwlist scanning` will show all the available networks.

Once you find a network, connect to it with iwconfig.  iwconfig is your tool for configuring the wireless interface; it is normally used to connect to a network.  Usage is simple, usually in the form: iwconfig <interface> <option> <parameters>.  Typically you’ll be using the following:

iwconfig <interface> essid <ESSID>

iwconfig <interface> key <KEY>

That’s all there is too it.  You can view your current authentication settings with `iwlist auth`.